Category Archives: Episodes

Season 30 News: The Simpsons Journey Back to Grampa’s War Days in January!

Information about the plot for the episode “Mad About the Toy“, which will air on January 6, 2019; has been released by FOX. The episode will be the 11th episode of Season 30.

In the episode …
“When Marge and Homer leave Grampa to babysit the kids, some little green army men trigger a PTSD episode, sending the family on a journey to Grampa’s past to when he was a post-war toy model.”

Guest stars
Guest stars for the episode include: Bryan Bott as photographer/Carl, Lawrence O’Donnell as himself and Mayor Bill DeBlasio as himself.

For further information…
If you want to read the original listing from FOX, visit this page.

If you want to know further info about the episode, check our Wiki article on it. We”re always keeping it up-to-date.

If you want to know more about Season 30, visit our page for it in our Wiki!

Stay tuned for more!

Review: ‘The Simpsons’ try to spend their Christmas in Florida in an uproarious episode!

We didn’t get the gift we wanted, a GL 50 9K Smart TV. The place we went was a dump, but isn’t Christmas really about being with your family and bartender?
– Bart

The 30th season of The Simpsons continues. The 10th episode of the season, “‘Tis the 30th Season“, is the 18th Christmas-themed episode of the show. And is also one of the best episodes of the season so far. It’s an hilarious, enjoyable combination of laughs, christmas and a travel episode. The best way to celebrate the show’s 29th anniversary, which will happen next week. This is also the last episode of the show… to air in 2018. New episodes will air starting in January 2019.

The episode opens after Thanksgiving dinner, when Bart and Lisa give Marge and Homer their Christmas present list, asking for a smart TV, which costs $2.400, but then a Black Friday offer at Sprawl-Mart is shown in TV, so Marge and Homer plan their shopping. Marge gets to Sprawl Mart, getting ready for the sale, and Homer fails to relieve her of the duty of standing in line by getting hit in the head by the door after getting his scarf stuck in it, felling unconscious. When the store opens, instead of getting the TV, Marge helps Gil get his Futon Friends toy for his grand-daughter, thus losing the chance to get the TV.

Marge is heavilly stressed about preparing a perfect Christmas, so Homer and the kids prepare a vacation for the family at the Kissimmee St. Nick Theme Park and Resort, but to take her there they have to sedate her. They arrive at the Resort, but its a completely ruined one. The theme park is even weirder, but they all try and show Marge they’re having some (faked) fun out of it, in order to make her happier, but in the morning Bart and Lisa complain to Jeanie, the manager of the place. Complaining about the fake appearance on the website, she explains that they can’t compete with the big ones, like Disney‘s new Family Guy World, and fends them off.

Back at the park, they go to the Tunnel of Love, the Gator Peeting Zoo and in the end at the Hall of Vice Presidents, where they all express their true feelings on the place. Bart manages to get their money back and they start their trip back to home. After finishing their fuel, they go by foot to town and discover Moe has been holding a dinner for the old and needy at his tavern and they join the dinner at the tavern, with Grampa too, realizing that “there is no place like Moe’s”. At the end Jeanie refunds them, and they buy the much desired smart TV and watch a burning log in a fireplace on it, in HD.

The episode, story by Jeff Westbrook, teleplay by John Frink and Joel H. Cohen and directed by Lance Kramer, is a solid mix of Christmas, family travel, Florida and smart TVs. This episode is one of the best episodes of the current season so far. And, while some episodes can be an unsure hit-or-miss, christmas episodes are usually an almost sure hit. These episodes appeal to family, generosity and they make you feel some seasonal joy and family warmness at the end. They’re like the perfect recipe.

This episode is very strong and very well-written. The originality of the story is quite notable, and it’s a sure laugh-generating episode. There are, as usual with this show, lots of freeze-frame jokes or some one-line jokes pretty well delivered. The episode also features the guest voice of Jane Lynch, who does a hilarious performance as Jeanie, the manager of the resort. The episode is packed with fun. The Simpsons will turn 29 years old next week, yet they are like Season 4, if that means something. This show is a master deliverer of THOH episodes, but it does even better when it comes to Christmas episodes, maybe because it was indeed a Christmas episode what started it all back in 1989? This show has always had a “thing” with Christmas-themed episodes.

This episode is a great, enjoyable episode that everyone must watch. In fact, everyone should watch all the episodes. Season 30 has raised its quality, both creative and technical, and has offered great, hilarious and most important of all, entertaining episodes so far. And let’s hope that will still happen in 2019 and beyond.

Stay tuned for more reviews!! And, as Comic Book Guy’s store sign says, have a Marvel Christmas and a DC New Year!!

Notes and Observations:

Season 30-31 News: A new episode title has been revealed!

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The title of the last and 22nd episode of the 30th production season (YABF22) has been revealed on Twitter by showrunner Al Jean.

It is titled “The Fat Blue Line“.

The episode will air during the 30th or 31st broadcast season (2018/19 TV season or 2019/20 TV season).

Stay tuned for more new episode titles! Don’t forget to visit our page on Season 30, as we always try to keep it up-to-date!

Review: Homer is Lisa’s hero in an emotional, acceptable episode!

“Give attention to Lisa, give attention to Bart. What am I, made of attention?”
– Homer

The 30th season of The Simpsons continues airing new episodes. The 9th episode of the season, “Daddicus Finch” is a sweet Homer-Lisa episode that is good but could have been slightly better.

The episode starts with a food-themed 2nd grade play at Springfield Elementary. Ralph is playing as broccoli, and fails to remember his colour (green) and says purple. Llewellyn Sinclair passes up to Nelson‘s origin of veal scene, consisting of him shooting a “cow” in the head with a captive-bolt gun, which Lisa (dressed as pork chop) protests about, claiming it should have been cut. Sinclair says the scene they were cutting was actually Lisa’s scene. Chalmers then proclaims show is over. Outside, Lisa is stuck in her pork-chop suit, something she hates. Marge nudges Homer to make her feel better. The next day, Marge asks Homer to make something with Lisa, so he takes her to the Springfield Mall, where he protects her dignity in a clothing store, and she sees him as Atticus Finch, the main character of the novel she’s reading, To Kill a Mockingbird.

At home, father and daughter watch the movie (the actual black-and-white real movie) based on the novel. Bart then arrives and changes the channel to The Itchy & Scratchy Show. Lisa says to Homer he’s her hero. Bart asks Maggie if he’s her hero, but it turns out she prefers Santa’s Little Helper and Grampa instead. Homer and Lisa’s relationship is better than ever: Homer takes her to the Springfield Science Museum and Lisa talks greatly about him as her hero at school. Bart starts feeling more jealous about their new relationship, and seeks help from Dr. Jessup, the school therapist, who tells him to act out until someone pays attention to him.

At Shauna‘s Bat mitzvah, he changes all cars’ keys, creating chaos once people get out of the event, and makes Milhouse accuse him, which makes the people chase Bart as an angry mob. Bart gets home and asks for help. Homer, acting as Atticus does, defuses the mob. Lisa and Bart fight over Homer, so Marge goes to Dr. Jessup to seek help too, because Lisa is idolizing Homer too much and creating uneaseness in the family. As a result, Homer talks with Lisa to make her move on that phase. She finishes reading the book and moves on at the same time. Homer then feels a bit sad but Maggie comforts him. The episode closes with Marge saying to Bart that, since they treasure him too, she’ll let him do one thing just for himself. Bart initially wants to kick Homer in the butt, but Marge tells him to give it some thought. Bart takes lots of years to decide what does he want to do, only to finally decide, now as an old man, that he wants to kick Homer in the butt, which he does to a R2-D2-looking robot version of Homer.

The episode, written by showrunner Al Jean and directed by Steven Dean Moore, tries to tell yet another Homer-Lisa relationship plot. The emotional part of the episode is undeniably well delivered. The pace of the episode overall feels somehow too fast, specifically the plot resolution feels too rushed up. Credited to a vet writer who is also the showrunner of the show, the episode certainly doesn’t lack some cleverly comical freeze-frame jokes (jokes that you may need to pause the episode to see; store names, newspaper headlines, stuff written in blackboards, …) listed in the section below.

The episode has a great voice acting, with a mention to Yeardley Smith‘s performance of Lisa talking with southern accent. The episode also has the always laugh-provoking J. K. Simmons guest starring as Dr. Jessup, the school therapist who can only spend 45 seconds per patient due to budget cutbacks. Jon Lovitz also guest stars as the always hilarious Llewellyn Sinclair. The episode is good. But the way is dealt with the resolution of the plot is just too rushed. Apart from that, the re-using of the now classic Homer-Lisa plot is actually well-handled.

Re-using a type of plot is always fine as far as it ends up being a different story after all, and proofs that a story can be told within different points of view, circumstances or settings. One can say “It’s yet another Homer-Lisa plot. They’ve run out of ideas” or can say “It’s yet another Homer-Lisa plot. They must have thought of a new story related to that kind of plot”. I choose the latter. It is not a bad episode after all. It’s an episode not to be missed. Season 30 has had an overall high quality that makes it feel like it’s Season 4 again, and this episode would feel more like Season 12. Has this last sentence any sense at all? Probably not. All the seasons are great. Anyway, we want The Simpsons for more years and if they keep the quality level of this season (or increase it even more), we’ll be even happier.

Stay tuned for more reviews!!

Notes and Observations:

  • The title of the episode is a reference to the fictional character “Atticus Finch” from the 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • It was about time to have a chalkboard gag in Season 30. The gag: “My pre-Christmas behavior really helps the coal industry”.
  • Freeze-frame gags spotted:
    • Springfield Elementary has this banners at the start of the episode: “Tonight Second Grade Play” and “2 hours shorter than last year’s”.
    • Springfield Mall has a banner that says “Rats control 3rd floor”.
    • The stores at the Mall:
    • Clothing lines in Wee Madame:
      • Twerking Girl is a reference to Working Girl and twerking.
      • Ho Sweet Ho is a reference to the saying “home sweet home”.
      • Call of Booty is a reference to Call of Duty.
      • Raggedy Anorexic is a reference to Raggedy Ann.
      • The Edge of Thirteen is a reference to The Edge of Seventeen.
      • Jack the Stripper is a reference to Jack the Ripper.
    • The blackboard of Lisa’s class has “Surprise Quiz Tomorrow” written on it.
    • Lisa reads To Kill a Mockingbird throughout the episode. In one scene, Bart is seen reading a parody called To Mock a Killing Bird.
    • In the museum, Professor Farnsworth appears with an exhibit of “The Science of Futurama“.
  • Miss Hoover mentions Wikipedia.
  • Heisenberger and Fries is a reference to physicist Werner Heisenberg.
  • In the school play, Nelson plays a parody of Anton Chigurh from the film No Country for Old Men.
  • Duffman mentions Netflix.
  • Grampa mentions Agatha Christie‘s books.
  • At the end, Homer’s head is mounted on a R2-D2-looking robot.
  • The episode was dedicated to Ricky Jay who passed away on November 24th, eight days before this episode aired.

Season 30 News: A new episode title has been revealed!

The list of episodes continues to fill up, as the title of the twentyfirst episode of the 30th production season (YABF21) has been revealed on this Instagram post.

It is titled “Go Big or Go Homer“.

Its writer has been revealed by Al Jean on Twitter.

 

 

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The episode will probably air during the 30th broadcast season (2018/19 TV season).

Stay tuned for more new episode titles! Don’t forget to visit our page on Season 30, as we always try to keep it up-to-date!

 

 

 

Review: Clowns and TV Recaps in a hilarious episode!

“Dad, you were born to recap TV at a fourth-grade level.” – Lisa

The 30th season of The Simpsons continues offering enjoyable episodes with the 8th episode of the season, “Krusty the Clown“, a must-watch brilliant episode that is a result of mixing clowns and TV recaps in the same episode.

The episode opens with an editorial meeting for the Daily Fourth Gradian, where Skinner announces that the sales have gone down, so he hired a new editor, Billy, who announces the journal is going online only and assigns Lisa to be a simple TV recapper. At home, she asks Homer to help her do the job as they watch The Krusty the Clown Show, starting with the Itchy & Scratchy episode Death Shawarma-ed Over. Sideshow Mel notifies Krusty of the recap, and the low grades Homer gives it. Krusty gets really mad and tries to kill Homer with the car and they eventually struggle while driving, ending up in an accident. Bart arrives at the scene and is relieved Krusty is still alive, and takes him away (from police) to a circus, changing his name to Soggy the Clown, while Homer becomes famous because of his recaps.

Krusty is a disaster in his new job and gets fired, but when one of the workers gets ill, he does a good performance and gets hired again. Unfortunately, the circus soon has to shut down because a terrible video (sold by the circus itself) got out. Meanwhile, Homer quits his job as a recapper when it starts ruinning his relationship with Marge, but then gets picked up by Google-Disney‘s CEO and brought to its office, where he is told that most of the current 400+ scripted shows are fake, as they just want to make people think they can watch them all and pay $13 to subscribe without seeing most of them. They want Homer to work for them making false recaps of the fake shows and he would have to give them a “B-” grade (“No one ever watches a B-minus.”-Homer). Homer instead decides to reveal that plan to the world by posting it online.

The circus where Krusty now works closes down, but the manager needs just “50 grand” to reopen it. To mantain it open, Krusty offers to turn himself in for the good of the circus and the police gives the reward to the circus crew. At the court, the jury finds Krusty not guilty. The circus leaves Springfield and Krusty bids farewell to them, as he then returns to his show. This time the show gets an “A” grade, making the clown happy again. Meanwhile, Billy gets mad with the DFG for publishing Homer and Lisa’s article revealing the plan of Peak TV, which gets replaced with an article about cooking scrambled eggs.

The episode, written by Ryan Koh and directed by Matthew Faughnan, delivers two brilliant comical stories in one episode. Krusty’s plot is a clever story as the clown has never been seen acting as… an actual clown (some circus-like performances have occurred throughout the past seasons, but he’s never acted as an actual clown to the extent he does in this episode. It should also be remarked that the story’s phasing is pleasantly written. The musical number is short but at least adds up to the story, as shows Krusty’s circus life.

The other plot is yet another “Homer finds he’s good at some unusual job but has to quit when either he discovers an evil plan from the boss (or co-workers) of the job or the job puts his marriage in danger” plot, but there’s greatness on sometimes repeating some “plot templates”, as the way of filling/using those templates needs to be original and preferably have a twisty or non-template conclusion each time. In other words, there is nothing bad in sometimes using plot templates as long as the non-template parts of the story keep being original, funny and enjoyable.

The episode also has the talented guest voices of Billy Eichner as Billy and Peter Serafinowicz as Google-Disney CEO. They both offer funny and well acted performances. Also, Dan Castellaneta needs some mention for his voiceover performances of Homer and Krusty. The other regular cast also made great performances (as always). The episode is a glorious, enjoyable episode that keeps the high quality Season 30 has proven so far. It’s a truly must-watch episode.

Stay tuned for more reviews!!

Notes and Observations:

  • When Homer is brought to Google-Disney, a list of shows can be seen scrolling in a screen, and later a considerable number of TV shows are listed and their logos can be seen. The full list of shows referenced is already on our wiki.
  • The woman with Comic Book Guy has a Firefly sweater on.
  • Some of the shows that Homer recaps are:
  • Scuzzo mentions that he saw a circus do a Beatles tribute without permission.
  • Patty says that Homer gave Outlander a “B-“.
  • The Google-Disney CEO mentions “USA Network”, while Homer mentions its shows:
    • Royal Pains
    • Suits
    • White Collar
  • Krusty had Chris Pine on his show and did a Star Trek segment.
  • Remarkable quotes:
    • “You see, if people subscribe but don’t watch, then we don’t actually have to make the shows. We just need viewers to believe they can watch them.” - Google-Disney CEO.
      “Fake shows? But what if people try to see them?” - Homer
      “They won’t, because recappers like you will give those shows a B-minus.” – CEO
      “No one ever watches a B-minus” - Homer.
    • “Like my show!” - Krusty
      “Why? Is it season four again?” - Homer.
    • After Homer recaps the snuggling with Marge:
      “[..]And don’t you dare give me a letter grade.” - Marge
      “Okay, I’ll just let this be… minus.” - Homer.
  • The clowns of the circus are called: Skitters, Bumpo, Wiggles, Scuzzo, Clabby, Dr. Pickles, Mr. Bindle, Barrels, Drooly, Trembles, Blitzy, Handsy, Boobsy, Mr. Boobsy, Baby Boobsy, the Boobsy Twins, Ding-a-ling, Bing-bong, Ring-a-ling, Flip-Flop, Fiddle-Faddle, Flap-Jack and Scene Blow.